Mixing social ads & sustainable ag.
What a perfect dark and stormy day for some art @SurvivingSandy
Got to get here - Diaghilev and the Ballet Russes @ngadc

Got to get here - Diaghilev and the Ballet Russes @ngadc

7 months ago
3 notes

Watching again #cp5 MUST SEE

8 months ago
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Knowing this makes life better - the etymology of Please, Thank You & You’re Welcome

Source: David Graeber’s Debt: The First 5,000 Years found from Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings

PLEASE

“ The English “please” is short for “if you please,” “if it pleases you to do this” — it is the same in most European languages (French si il vous plait, Spanish por favor). Its literal meaning is “you are under no obligation to do this.” “Hand me the salt. Not that I am saying that you have to!” This is not true; there is a social obligation, and it would be almost impossible not to comply. But etiquette largely consists of the exchange of polite fictions (to use less polite language, lies). When you ask someone to pass the salt, you are also giving them an order; by attaching the word “please,” you are saying that it is not an order. But, in fact, it is.

THANK YOU

In English, “thank you” derives from “think,” it originally meant, “I will remember what you did for me” — which is usually not true either — but in other languages (the Portuguese obrigadois a good example) the standard term follows the form of the English “much obliged” — it actually does means “I am in your debt.” The French merci is even more graphic: it derives from “mercy,” as in begging for mercy; by saying it you are symbolically placing yourself in your benefactor”s power — since a debtor is, after all, a criminal.

YOU’RE WELCOME

Saying “you’re welcome,” or “it’s nothing” (French de rien, Spanish de nada) — the latter has at least the advantage of often being literally true — is a way of reassuring the one to whom one has passed the salt that you are not actually inscribing a debit in your imaginary moral account book. So is saying “my pleasure” — you are saying, “No, actually, it’s a credit, not a debit — you did me a favor because in asking me to pass the salt, you gave me the opportunity to do something I found rewarding in itself!”… 

9 months ago
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Quoting Krishna, fighting Monsanto - I love this woman.

6 months ago
3 notes

What’s missing from picture #3? Seeing what can survive a typical Iowa field. From A World in One Cubic Foot by David Liittschwager. @npr

8 months ago
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http://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2013/07/when-judges-assume-that-men-cannot-control-their-own-sexual-urges/277880/
9 months ago
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